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What the Disney World of Creativity Inspires

What happened when a bankrupt artist moved to Hollywood with a suitcase full of clothes? Well, it turns out that he started a creative media empire that has touched the lives of millions in so many ways.

disney-creativity-courage
Walt Disney on courage and creative dreams.

Years ago Mom packed three kids into a copper Gremlin and drove us all down to “Wallyworld.”  On many hot summer days in Jersey City she would park us in the cool air-conditioned theater to watch double-features like Herbie Rides Again with Cinderella.

On Sunday nights our family tuned into the weekly Wonderful World of Disney movie. Years later I took my own kids to visit Disneyland and saw the magic in their eyes.

The Disney creative history reads like some biblical lineage - Disney begot John Lasseter who begot Pixar who begot Edward Catmull who begot Brad Bird. And so on..

Is it any wonder this company is currently valued at $120 billion with over 180,000 employees?

..or that they jealously guard their trademark? Woe be those who would think of painting Disney characters on a daycare nursery wall without the approval of their attorneys!

Where did it all start? How did a man and a mouse come to create this entertainment empire?

“I only hope that we don't lose sight of one thing - that it was all started by a mouse.” - Walt Disney

Dare to Be Curious

It takes courage to ask questions. Disney inspired web designer Rogie King says.. “Curiosity is key..” He says that Disney has always been an inspiration in everything he does - commitment to quality, theme, environment and storytelling.
Innovation takes this combination of courage and curiosity. Disney was the first to use sound for animation, then the first to use color. He received more Academy Awards than any other artist in his lifetime.

It Takes Three to Tango

In his first volume of Strategies of Genius NLP pioneer Robert Dilts talks about Disney’s creativity strategy as being three roles - dreamer, realist, and critic

Dreamer - give ourselves room to roam.. to explore and not limit ourselves. Too often we’re self-editing before we’ve given our creativity a chance to breathe. It’s playing with the wide-eyed energy of a child.

Realist - dreaming is great, but the realist rolls up their sleeves and gets to work, putting a plan into practice. While it’s great to visit the worlds of fantasy, we live in this world, and the value of visions is in making them real. Timelines and milestones measure our progress.

Critic - finally, test & test again. Taking in feedback and choosing your response is not the end. Failures disguised as mistakes are really opportunities to learn and adapt. As someone said, “You’ve paid for lesson.. so you might as well benefit from the lessons!”

Test your plan, look for problems, difficulties and unintended consequences. Evaluate them. Ask yourself "What could go wrong?" Think of what is missing, what is surplus, what the spins-offs will be. Define the context in which your plan is workable and problematic.

We tend to think of creativity as some wild, untamed animal. Disney showed how you can create systems that allow artists to be more creative.

How has Disney touched your own life? What ways has this inspired your creativity?

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